Archive for the 'Movies' Category

Grass Roots Movement


April 20th, 2010

grass
Big news!! We finally finished editing the WHEATGRASS EPISODE for PRL TV! It was a lot of work putting it together. But I’m really happy with how it turned out. I can’t say enough nice things about wheatgrass. It’s magical.

freshSpeaking of grass, I’m going to see the movie ‘FRESH‘ tonight. I’ve already seen it, but I love it. Apparently, they’ve managed to get theatrical distribution now via a grass roots effort. I’m so happy for them. There are a lot of movies out there now which are detailing the demise of our food system, but this one is the most positive. It offers solutions for people who want to get involved and is more focused on what we can do as individuals to affect change. Very inspiring.

ana sofia joanes
Here is the director, Ana Sofia Joanes. She was in town the other day promoting the film with farmer/renegade, JOEL SALATIN.

joelJoel Salatin is my hero! He’s featured in the movie. He’s hilarious, down to earth, and really articulate. He runs an organic farm called POLYFACE FARMS. When his family purchased the farm, it was a junk farm. The soil was eroded, and it was not very productive. Now it is a model of viability and polycultural farming.

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omnivore's dilmeJoel was also featured prominently in Michael Pollan’s book, THE OMNIVORE’S DILEMMA. This book was amazing. It really changed the way I thought about food. It’s a wonderful overview of our food system and how it evolved to it’s present state. Very informative, entertaining, and easy to understand.

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cheesecake
In other news, I’ve started testing recipes for the tasting party I’m having next week to drum up catering business. This is the first cheesecake I’ve made with fermented cashew cheese. Came out pretty good…

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King Corn


January 22nd, 2008

king corn

I watched a great movie last night – KING CORN. It was a documentary about industrialized agriculture. Two friends from college came to Iowa after graduation to grow an acre of corn. Interestingly, both men had great grandfathers who came to the east coast from the same small town in Iowa where they were both in the corn business. While they focused on a really controversial topic, the two maintained a sort of impartial observer status throughout the movie allowing people to draw their own conclusions about their findings. It was really tastefully done.
ellis and cheney

What they did find was both disturbing and enlightening in that it shed light on the roots of our system of industrial agriculture. The system was developed and refined not with with nutrition or food quality in mind. Rather, the system is set up to yield the highest quantity of food commodity ultimately serving the interests of multinational corporations before those who would eat it. The byproduct is that the system is ironically setup to select against the nutritional value of not only the corn that results but also the animals and livestock that are forced to eat it having far reaching consequences that are as shocking as they are unexpected. This movie will change the way you look at corn! One of the most interesting moments of the movie was when they interviewed Earl Butz, a controversial figure in modern farming. He was the architect of the modern farm subsidies which many believe has fueled this imbalance in the system. It was really interesting to get his perspective and to put it in the context of an earlier generation – how their struggles would ultimately shape the problems that we face today. Almost as if the generation that had survived the great depression were fueled by this desire to create an overwhelming abundance. And their dreams have now become our reality – for better or for worse.

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